Deciphering the Patterns: Learning From Over a Billion Years of Innovation | Roundarch Blog

 

 

In our crusade for the grail of design innovation, nature’s 4.6 billion years of (re) evolutionary design supplies us with the perfect template.

Design innovation isn’t just about having the “big idea” (more about that and the role of research in my next post) – it’s a process, a funnel that produces success equal only to the cumulative failure required to achieve it. Not clear on that? Let mother earth and arguably the most successful innovation of all time, you and me, bring it into focus. You’ll notice there seem to be rules, patterns actually, to producing innovation, and massively successful designs (like homo sapiens and the ubiquitous iPod) have harnessed that power.

via Deciphering the Patterns: Learning From Over a Billion Years of Innovation | Roundarch Blog.

Product Design Ideation Process at Goddard Technologies, an Engineering Design Firm in Beverly, Massachusetts

 

 

At GTI, we utilize a “funnel” process where we capture many ideas when in a concept ideation stage of the project. It is important not to rule out ideas until they have all been carefully weighed and evaluated.

Our team pays close attention to the requirements and end goals when developing the early stage concepts. The “funnel” narrows by carefully evaluating each idea against a battery of criteria, i.e. cost, manufacturability, ease of use, availability, commonality of parts, etc.

Not until all factors are weighed does an idea become the final choice and final intent for the project.

via Product Design Ideation Process at Goddard Technologies, an Engineering Design Firm in Beverly, Massachusetts.

76 Powerful Thoughts from Paul Graham

Paul Graham is most famous for heading up Y Combinator, a seed-stage startup funding firm, and also for Hacker News, a social news website revolving around computer hacking, startup companies, and as their submission guidelines state, “anything that gratifies one’s intellectual curiosity”. Graham’s essays online are highly regarded for their insight and relevance – and his book, Hackers and Painters, is no different.

1. Nerds serve two masters. They want to be popular, certainly, but they want even more to be smart.

2. An American teenager may work at being popular every waking hour, 365 days a year.

3. Most people seem to consider the ability to draw as some kind of innate quality, like being tall. In fact, most people who “can draw” like drawing, and have spent many hours doing it; that’s why they’re good at it.

4. Smart people’s lives are worst between, say, the ages of eleven and seventeen. Life at that age revolves far more around popularity than before or after.

5. People unsure of their own position will try to emphasize it by maltreating those they think rank below.

6. To become more popular, you need to be constantly doing things that bring you close to other popular people, and nothing brings people closer than a common enemy.

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76 Powerful Thoughts from Paul Graham.